Swim England #LoveSwimming Campaign

To coincide with ‘Mental Health Awareness Week’ the swimming sector has released the next chapter in the #LoveSwimming campaign encouraging adults, in particular females, to escape the stresses of busy life by making time for a swim at their local pool. Mental health is becoming an increasingly talked about issue and according to the charity Mind, one in four British adults experience a mental health problem in any one year and 80% of mental illness is related to anxiety and depression.

‘Escape’ reflects the extremes of fast-paced modern life and the impact it can have on your mental health, in stark comparison to the unique environment offered by swimming. Swimming provides the ultimate block to external stimuli. The inability to see almost anything except the line at the bottom of the pool and hear nothing but your rhythmic breathing creates the ultimate moving meditation. The film features real women who have seen the positive effects of swimming in coping with their mental health issues.

Mark spent one day with the Swim England team at Marshall Street Leisure Centre in Soho, London filming underwater, topside and with his Phantom4Pro drone for the campaign. See @swimengland on Instagram for additional content.

Meditation and swimming

It was five years ago, as mindfulness started to creep onto the periphery of our collective consciousness that I began to wonder if from what people said about meditation and mindfulness that it described the mind-set I experienced after a swim. I was intrigued to find out if they were the same. Before exploring it, the phrases that I associated with mindfulness and meditation were ‘a clear head’ and ‘reduced stress’. These are things that I can remember starting to notice after swims when I was at secondary school, I’d often work out the answer to something or just feel much calmer. Mindfulness is commonly described as a simple form of mediation or mind training. For me, mindfulness is a way of learning to be aware and observe your thoughts (both good and bad) with the aim of not getting caught up and being non-judgemental about them (some days this is easier than others). It’s a chance to step back, learn more about yourself and how your mind works.

Similarities between swimming and mindfulness
As I become more practised, I discovered that the effects are similar to how I felt after a swim, and for me, it’s due to the two main similarities between both activities:

Breathing
The type of meditation that I learned focuses on breathing and in swimming, breathing is absolutely key. I see this from a coaching point of view, the swimmer who isn’t exhaling properly often fatigues quickly or feels panicky.

Focus on what you’re currently doing
When you swim, there are no other distractions, a rarity in this digital age and we just focus on technique, or times, or the distance we’re swimming i.e. we’re focused on what we’re doing. I’ve found that mindfulness has helped my swimming and swimming has helped my mindfulness, which both in turn help me in everyday life.
— Lucy Lloyd-Roach, Swim England Coach

Mindfulness techniques to try next time you go swimming

Breathing

  • On front crawl you can count and say out loud your breathing pattern into the water e.g. ‘One’, ‘two’, ‘three’. As you say it out loud, you’ll actually exhale into the water.

  • Swim 200m front crawl, breathing every three strokes for the first 50m, breathe every four strokes to the left for 50m, breathe every five strokes for 50m and finally breathe every four to the right for 50m. Aim for a smooth continual exhalation. If breathing every five strokes is too challenging, switch to breathing everything three strokes on the third 50m.

  • Slow it down – focus on long stretched arm and leg movements rather than making your swim a frantic race.

Technique

  • Focus on one key part of your technique, e.g. a strong kick together on breaststroke. As you swim, the brain will start to switch focus to this rather what else it’s been focused on within every day life.

Counting strokes

  • Try counting the number of strokes per length. What do you notice about your technique? Does it feel the same throughout the length? Does it change from the start to the end of your swim?

Mark tells us more about his experience with the new Fujinon Lenses

Question: What shoot have you recently taken the Fujinon lenses on?

I’m just back from the Bahamas where I was working on a Shark Week shoot for Discovery. I was filming topside and drone from a boat for the duration, so camera and lens choice was key. My pair of E mount Fujinon lenses (MK18-55mm and MK50-135mm) were the natural choice together with my Sony FS7 as they are the perfect match especially for this type of job

Question: Tell us more about why the Fujinon lenses were a great fit for this shoot?

The production wanted to achieve a cinematic look and feel using a shallow depth of field throughout. So, shooting wide open at T2.9 I was able to achieve some very pleasing results with the actuality. We filmed a large portion of the footage into the night (under the boats minimal lighting) so, in this environment with these lenses I was still able to expose the contributors effectively

Question: What USPs specific to the Fujinon lenses do you find most impressive?

As well as ‘the look’ I wanted to achieve an additional consideration for the on-the-shoulder sync filming is the overall weight of the camera. So, with each lens weighing in at 0.9kg (which is incredibly light weight for such a lens) it makes for a much more comfortable set up; a hugely important factor when you’re working across the length and breadth of a boat for long hours, into the evening

Question: How did you utilise the full range of the two Fujinon lenses whilst on location?

The 18-55 is great for general sync shots and actuality; wide enough to get establishes and two shots and tight enough for pushing in for close ups and details. When it comes to shooting with another member of the camera team the 50-135 is perfect for close up reactions
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